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Abb. 1 Maternal high-fat diet consumption impairs exercise performance in offspring

Abb. 1 Maternal high-fat diet feeding during gestation and lactation impairs exercise ... mehr

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Stand: 23.01.2018 22:47:15

Abteilung Physiologie des Energiestoffwechsels (EST)

Projekt 1 : Maternal high-fat diet consumption impairs exercise performance in offspring

Juliane Kasch, Sara Schumann

It is known that suboptimal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation can alter the physiology of the offspring and increase their predisposition to metabolic diseases in adult life. For skeletal muscle (SM) development, the fetal stage is of paramount importance since there is no net increase in muscle fiber number after birth. Here we scrutinized the influence of maternal high-fat diet consumption during gestation and lactation on exercise performance and energy metabolism in male mouse offspring. Female mice were fed either a semisynthetic high-fat (HFD, 40% kcal fat) or low-fat diet (LFD, 10% kcal fat) throughout gestation and lactation. After weaning, male offspring of both groups received the LFD and from the age of 7 weeks on, half the mice of the both maternal feeding groups were given access to a running wheel for 6 weeks as a voluntary exercise training opportunity. Before and after, all mice were subjected to an exercise endurance test. Mice whose mothers had been fed a high fat diet showed a reduced exercise performance and training efficiency as adults (Fig. 1). Thus, we have demonstrated for the first time that perinatal exposure to maternal high-fat diet consumption results in decreased exercise performance and training efficiency in the offspring (Walter and Klaus, 2014). The exact molecular mechanisms still need to be evaluated, but our data suggest the involvement of direct effects on muscle function linked to a compromise of SM energy supply.

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